New Zealand Businesses

 

Demand response (DR) in New Zealand enables local organisations to earn money by helping the grid manage spikes in demand and keep electricity prices low. In addition, DR can act as a valuable grid-stabilising resource for systems that are as green as New Zealand’s. The level of power generated by wind and hydro resources fluctuate throughout the day, and to support changing generation capacity and security, these participating companies reduce consumption or take their operations off the grid for short periods of time.

Incorporating DR into your business can be a great resource for additional revenue, but successful implementation requires market expertise and an understanding of your operation. With the right partner by your side, DR participation can be customised to suit virtually all industry without operational disruption. You can receive significant payments for proactively managing energy use and by helping to keep the electricity supply secure and affordable for the community.

 

Fast Facts

Industry: Lumber
Location: Multiple locations in the North Island, New Zealand
​Programme: EnerNOC New Zealand - Interruptible Load
Demand Response Strategy: Load Curtailment

Juken New Zealand Ltd (JNL)

EnerNOC’s New Zealand Interruptible Load (IL) programme is one of the most sophisticated demand response programmes in the world. Operating in the Instantaneous Reserves market, EnerNOC automatically reduces capacity across dozens of sites to adjust for the small number of major fluctuations in the balance between electricity generation and demand. JNL enrolled its Gisborne and Masterton sites in the Fast Instantaneous Reserves market (FIR), where load from their dryers are removed within one second of the frequency drop and maintained for 60 seconds before resuming normal operations. Its Kataia site is also enrolled in the programme, in Sustained Instantaneous Reserves (SIR) where some equipment is quickly removed but kept offline for up to 30 minutes. This includes their kiln fans and chippers, which are able to be powered down for a longer period without impacting production. According to Chris Osborne at JNL, nominating specific loads for different reserves enables JNL to benefit from the different participation opportunities available in the programme, and a good understanding of their business and operational flexibility ensures that neither deliverables nor equipment are negatively impacted.

 

Fast Facts

Industry: Meat Processing and Cold Storage
Location: Multiple locations in the North and South Island, New Zealand
​Programme: EnerNOC New Zealand - Interruptible Load
Demand Response Strategy: Load Curtailment

Silver Fern Farms

Silver Fern Farms (SFF) has been a participant of the IL programme since 2010 and now has five of its sites enrolled in the programme across the country in both the FIR and SIR markets; four in the North Island and one in the South Island. According to its Beef Engineering Manager, Ray Jenkins, the IL programme enabled the organisation to take on energy conservation efforts without having to invest in new, expensive resources. Additionally, the organisation saw this as an opportunity to contribute to a better use of electrical resources in the country. According to Jenkins, determining which equipment could be turned off during a dispatch took some time, but the process helped the organisation gain a better understanding of their consumption. Food safety is top priority, so an energy reduction plan was created around avoiding sensitive equipment and processes, and SFF opted to reduce load from refrigeration in the final freezing process for short periods. The company received step-by-step assistance from EnerNOC throughout the implementation process, and since then, dispatches have been seamless and site managers have had no issues.

 

Fast Facts

Industry: Local Government, Water and Wastewater
Location: Multiple locations in the North Island, New Zealand
​Programme: EnerNOC New Zealand Interruptible Load, Genesis Energy - EnerNOC
Demand Response Strategy: Load Curtailment, Transfer load to backup generator

Greater Wellington Regional Council

The Greater Wellington Regional Council has been an EnerNOC customer since 2010, providing over 1.4 MW of demand response reductions across two DR programmes in New Zealand. The council was one of the earliest to enrol in DR in the region. Geoff Williams, Team Leader of Assets and Compliance says that it was an economic decision and after several years, the concept of being involved is business-as-usual. The council’s Waterloo Water Treatment Plant participates in both programmes through different processes. For IL dispatches, load from water pumps is removed as a Fast Instantaneous Reserve. In the Genesis Energy-EnerNOC Demand Response Programme, which calls for longer dispatches between two to four hours at a time, the council’s Waterloo and Te Marua sites have enrolled diesel generators to support necessary load throughout the period. Williams sees DR as a good opportunity for generator-testing under actual load, and while analysing equipment during the enablement process, the council has also been able to ensure seamless load transfers and improve the capacity of the Te Marua site. Based on the success and improvements brought by DR participation, Williams is keen on exploring further opportunities and extending participation to other council sites.